10 Women’s Inventions That Changed the World


A circular saw

Tabitha Bab­bitt, 1813

It was invented by the weaver Tabitha Babbit, who lived in an American religious community in the 19th century.  She watched men sawing logs with an ordinary two-handed saw, and created a pen...
It was invent­ed by the weaver Tabitha Bab­bit, who lived in an Amer­i­can reli­gious com­mu­ni­ty in the 19th cen­tu­ry. She watched men saw­ing logs with a con­ven­tion­al two-hand­ed saw, and cre­at­ed the first pro­to­type of a cir­cu­lar saw, which she attached to her spin­ning wheel. There is still con­tro­ver­sy around the inven­tion, and some­one believes that cir­cu­lar saws exist­ed before. How­ev­er, the first device launched into mass pro­duc­tion was cre­at­ed pre­cise­ly accord­ing to the pro­to­type of Tabitha Bab­bitt in 1813.

Dishwasher

Josephine Cochrane, 1886

In 1850, a young Amer­i­can, John Goughton, patent­ed an inven­tion that he expect­ed could auto­mate the process of wash­ing dish­es. In prac­tice, it only broke the plates and left half the uten­sils dirty. As a result, a real dish­wash­er appeared — it was invent­ed by a sim­ple house­wife Josephine Cochrane in 1886. The device per­fect­ly washed dish­es, heat­ed water by itself with the help of a prim­i­tive heat­ing ele­ment and was eas­i­ly installed in the kitchen. Josephine soon improved her inven­tion and even added a built-in dry­er to the dish­wash­er.


First programming language

Ada Lovelace, mid 19th cen­tu­ry

Eng­lish math­e­mati­cian Ada Lovelace was born in 1815 and wrote the first com­put­er pro­gram — and in her time com­put­ers exist­ed only in the­o­ry. Lovelace’s code was an algo­rithm for cal­cu­lat­ing Bernoul­li num­bers and was applied 100 years lat­er on real devices. Ada coined the terms “loop” and “work cell”, and in the 20th cen­tu­ry the Ada pro­gram­ming lan­guage was named after her. By the way, we even did a sep­a­rate arti­cle ded­i­cat­ed to Ada Lovelace.


Car wipers

Mary Ander­son, 1903

Modern windshield wipers were invented by American Mary Anderson - a woman was riding in a trolleybus, the driver of which was forced to look out the open window through the snow to watch the road.
Mod­ern wind­shield wipers were invent­ed by Amer­i­can Mary Ander­son — a woman was rid­ing in a trol­ley­bus, the dri­ver of which was forced to look out the open win­dow through the snow to watch the road. Mary cre­at­ed a mod­el of steer­able wipers that were mount­ed on the wind­shield and patent­ed it in 1903. The first wind­shield wipers were very sim­ple — a lever with a weight and a pair of slats that drove on the glass. Wipers soon became a manda­to­ry part of any car, although Mary was nev­er able to sell her patent to major man­u­fac­tur­ers.

Silencer for cars

El Dolores Jones, 1917

The first cars were produced without a silencer at all - you can imagine how much noise they created on the road: they scared horses, people, and generally interfered with living peacefully and moving along the streets ...
The first cars were pro­duced with­out a silencer at all — you can imag­ine how much noise they cre­at­ed on the road: they scared hors­es, peo­ple, and gen­er­al­ly inter­fered with liv­ing peace­ful­ly and mov­ing along the streets. El Dolores Jones cor­rect­ed the sit­u­a­tion by invent­ing an acoustic fil­ter for car engines. The inven­tion was patent­ed back in 1917 and was installed on all machines.

Heating boiler

Alice H. Park­er, 1919

The African-Amer­i­can Alice H. Park­er invent­ed the gas heat­ing boil­er exact­ly one hun­dred years ago — back in 1919. Thanks to this inven­tion, mil­lions of peo­ple can still heat their home on a bud­get. The Park­er boil­er was eas­i­ly installed in heat­ing net­works, and was not used local­ly, like pre­vi­ous mod­els, and quick­ly found appli­ca­tion in apart­ment build­ings.


invisible glass

Kather­ine Blod­gett, 1939

Katherine Blodgett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest company, General Electric.  It was she who developed the technology for making glass, with ...

Kather­ine Blod­gett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest com­pa­ny, Gen­er­al Elec­tric. It was she who devel­oped the glass man­u­fac­tur­ing tech­nol­o­gy, in which it trans­mit­ted more than 99% of the light. In 1939, her inven­tion was used in cin­e­ma, and now such glass is used in lens­es, tele­scopes, car win­dows and glass­es.

The basis of Wi-Fi

Hedy Lamarr, 1942

Hollywood actress of Austrian origin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spectacular and beautiful woman, but also a successful inventor.  In 1942, she came up with a communication system in which...
Hol­ly­wood actress of Aus­tri­an ori­gin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spec­tac­u­lar and beau­ti­ful woman, but also a suc­cess­ful inven­tor. In 1942, she came up with a com­mu­ni­ca­tion sys­tem in which the sig­nal trans­mis­sion chan­nel changes dynam­i­cal­ly. The tech­nol­o­gy of spread spec­trum and fre­quen­cy hop­ping was called the “Secret Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Sys­tem” and served to remote­ly con­trol tor­pe­does so that they could not be inter­cept­ed. How­ev­er, half a cen­tu­ry lat­er, it became the basis for cel­lu­lar com­mu­ni­ca­tions and Wi-Fi. By the way, here we talked in detail about Hedy Lamarr and her inven­tion.

Kevlar and body armor

Ste­fa­nia Kwolek, 1965

Kevlar was invented by Dr. Stefania Kwolek in 1965 - she was a chemist at the largest DuPont company.  Stefania was looking for a durable fiber to use in tires, but ended up discovering kevl...
Kevlar was invent­ed by Dr. Ste­fa­nia Kwolek in 1965 — she was a chemist at the largest DuPont com­pa­ny. Ste­fa­nia was look­ing for a strong fiber to use in tires, but end­ed up dis­cov­er­ing Kevlar, a flex­i­ble, light­weight, and durable sub­stance that is now used to make bul­let­proof vests for police, mil­i­tary, and fire­fight­ers. In total, Kwolek patent­ed 28 inven­tions and was induct­ed into the Nation­al Inven­tors Hall of Fame.

Silicone

Patri­cia Billings, 1970

Oddly enough, silicone was invented by a female sculptor, not plastic surgeons: Patricia Billings was looking for a cement additive for the strength of her sculptures.  As a result, in 1970, she created ...
Odd­ly enough, sil­i­cone was invent­ed by a female sculp­tor, not plas­tic sur­geons: Patri­cia Billings was look­ing for a cement addi­tive for the strength of her sculp­tures. In the end, in 1970, she cre­at­ed a spe­cial kind of inde­struc­tible plas­ter that was resis­tant to fire and great for art. Lat­er, many more uses were found for sil­i­cone, but ini­tial­ly it was used in the cre­ation of sculp­tures.

Read also:

  • What to give on March 8: ideas for every taste and bud­get = “content_internal_link”>
  • Thank you, don’t: what not to give a girl on March 8


First programming language

Ada Lovelace, mid 19th cen­tu­ry

Eng­lish math­e­mati­cian Ada Lovelace was born in 1815 and wrote the first com­put­er pro­gram — and in her time com­put­ers exist­ed only in the­o­ry. Lovelace’s code was an algo­rithm for cal­cu­lat­ing Bernoul­li num­bers and was applied 100 years lat­er on real devices. Ada coined the terms “loop” and “work cell”, and in the 20th cen­tu­ry the Ada pro­gram­ming lan­guage was named after her. By the way, we even did a sep­a­rate arti­cle ded­i­cat­ed to Ada Lovelace.


Car wipers

Mary Ander­son, 1903

Modern windshield wipers were invented by American Mary Anderson - a woman was riding in a trolleybus, the driver of which was forced to look out the open window through the snow to watch the road.
Mod­ern wind­shield wipers were invent­ed by Amer­i­can Mary Ander­son — a woman was rid­ing in a trol­ley­bus, the dri­ver of which was forced to look out the open win­dow through the snow to watch the road. Mary cre­at­ed a mod­el of steer­able wipers that were mount­ed on the wind­shield and patent­ed it in 1903. The first wind­shield wipers were very sim­ple — a lever with a weight and a pair of slats that drove on the glass. Wipers soon became a manda­to­ry part of any car, although Mary was nev­er able to sell her patent to major man­u­fac­tur­ers.

Silencer for cars

El Dolores Jones, 1917

The first cars were produced without a silencer at all - you can imagine how much noise they created on the road: they scared horses, people, and generally interfered with living peacefully and moving along the streets ...
The first cars were pro­duced with­out a silencer at all — you can imag­ine how much noise they cre­at­ed on the road: they scared hors­es, peo­ple, and gen­er­al­ly inter­fered with liv­ing peace­ful­ly and mov­ing along the streets. El Dolores Jones cor­rect­ed the sit­u­a­tion by invent­ing an acoustic fil­ter for car engines. The inven­tion was patent­ed back in 1917 and was installed on all machines.

Heating boiler

Alice H. Park­er, 1919

The African-Amer­i­can Alice H. Park­er invent­ed the gas heat­ing boil­er exact­ly one hun­dred years ago — back in 1919. Thanks to this inven­tion, mil­lions of peo­ple can still heat their home on a bud­get. The Park­er boil­er was eas­i­ly installed in heat­ing net­works, and was not used local­ly, like pre­vi­ous mod­els, and quick­ly found appli­ca­tion in apart­ment build­ings.


invisible glass

Kather­ine Blod­gett, 1939

Katherine Blodgett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest company, General Electric.  It was she who developed the technology for making glass, with ...

Kather­ine Blod­gett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest com­pa­ny, Gen­er­al Elec­tric. It was she who devel­oped the glass man­u­fac­tur­ing tech­nol­o­gy, in which it trans­mit­ted more than 99% of the light. In 1939, her inven­tion was used in cin­e­ma, and now such glass is used in lens­es, tele­scopes, car win­dows and glass­es.

The basis of Wi-Fi

Hedy Lamarr, 1942

Hollywood actress of Austrian origin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spectacular and beautiful woman, but also a successful inventor.  In 1942, she came up with a communication system in which...
Hol­ly­wood actress of Aus­tri­an ori­gin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spec­tac­u­lar and beau­ti­ful woman, but also a suc­cess­ful inven­tor. In 1942, she came up with a com­mu­ni­ca­tion sys­tem in which the sig­nal trans­mis­sion chan­nel changes dynam­i­cal­ly. The tech­nol­o­gy of spread spec­trum and fre­quen­cy hop­ping was called the “Secret Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Sys­tem” and served to remote­ly con­trol tor­pe­does so that they could not be inter­cept­ed. How­ev­er, half a cen­tu­ry lat­er, it became the basis for cel­lu­lar com­mu­ni­ca­tions and Wi-Fi. By the way, here we talked in detail about Hedy Lamarr and her inven­tion.

Kevlar and body armor

Ste­fa­nia Kwolek, 1965

Kevlar was invented by Dr. Stefania Kwolek in 1965 - she was a chemist at the largest DuPont company.  Stefania was looking for a durable fiber to use in tires, but ended up discovering kevl...
Kevlar was invent­ed by Dr. Ste­fa­nia Kwolek in 1965 — she was a chemist at the largest DuPont com­pa­ny. Ste­fa­nia was look­ing for a strong fiber to use in tires, but end­ed up dis­cov­er­ing Kevlar, a flex­i­ble, light­weight, and durable sub­stance that is now used to make bul­let­proof vests for police, mil­i­tary, and fire­fight­ers. In total, Kwolek patent­ed 28 inven­tions and was induct­ed into the Nation­al Inven­tors Hall of Fame.

Silicone

Patri­cia Billings, 1970

Oddly enough, silicone was invented by a female sculptor, not plastic surgeons: Patricia Billings was looking for a cement additive for the strength of her sculptures.  As a result, in 1970, she created ...
Odd­ly enough, sil­i­cone was invent­ed by a female sculp­tor, not plas­tic sur­geons: Patri­cia Billings was look­ing for a cement addi­tive for the strength of her sculp­tures. In the end, in 1970, she cre­at­ed a spe­cial kind of inde­struc­tible plas­ter that was resis­tant to fire and great for art. Lat­er, many more uses were found for sil­i­cone, but ini­tial­ly it was used in the cre­ation of sculp­tures.

Read also:

  • What to give on March 8: ideas for every taste and bud­get = “content_internal_link”>
  • Thank you, don’t: what not to give a girl on March 8


invisible glass

Kather­ine Blod­gett, 1939

Katherine Blodgett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest company, General Electric.  It was she who developed the technology for making glass, with ...

Kather­ine Blod­gett was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and work for the largest com­pa­ny, Gen­er­al Elec­tric. It was she who devel­oped the glass man­u­fac­tur­ing tech­nol­o­gy, in which it trans­mit­ted more than 99% of the light. In 1939, her inven­tion was used in cin­e­ma, and now such glass is used in lens­es, tele­scopes, car win­dows and glass­es.

The basis of Wi-Fi

Hedy Lamarr, 1942

Hollywood actress of Austrian origin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spectacular and beautiful woman, but also a successful inventor.  In 1942, she came up with a communication system in which...
Hol­ly­wood actress of Aus­tri­an ori­gin Hedy Lamarr was not only a spec­tac­u­lar and beau­ti­ful woman, but also a suc­cess­ful inven­tor. In 1942, she came up with a com­mu­ni­ca­tion sys­tem in which the sig­nal trans­mis­sion chan­nel changes dynam­i­cal­ly. The tech­nol­o­gy of spread spec­trum and fre­quen­cy hop­ping was called the “Secret Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Sys­tem” and served to remote­ly con­trol tor­pe­does so that they could not be inter­cept­ed. How­ev­er, half a cen­tu­ry lat­er, it became the basis for cel­lu­lar com­mu­ni­ca­tions and Wi-Fi. By the way, here we talked in detail about Hedy Lamarr and her inven­tion.

Kevlar and body armor

Ste­fa­nia Kwolek, 1965

Kevlar was invented by Dr. Stefania Kwolek in 1965 - she was a chemist at the largest DuPont company.  Stefania was looking for a durable fiber to use in tires, but ended up discovering kevl...
Kevlar was invent­ed by Dr. Ste­fa­nia Kwolek in 1965 — she was a chemist at the largest DuPont com­pa­ny. Ste­fa­nia was look­ing for a strong fiber to use in tires, but end­ed up dis­cov­er­ing Kevlar, a flex­i­ble, light­weight, and durable sub­stance that is now used to make bul­let­proof vests for police, mil­i­tary, and fire­fight­ers. In total, Kwolek patent­ed 28 inven­tions and was induct­ed into the Nation­al Inven­tors Hall of Fame.

Silicone

Patri­cia Billings, 1970

Oddly enough, silicone was invented by a female sculptor, not plastic surgeons: Patricia Billings was looking for a cement additive for the strength of her sculptures.  As a result, in 1970, she created ...
Odd­ly enough, sil­i­cone was invent­ed by a female sculp­tor, not plas­tic sur­geons: Patri­cia Billings was look­ing for a cement addi­tive for the strength of her sculp­tures. In the end, in 1970, she cre­at­ed a spe­cial kind of inde­struc­tible plas­ter that was resis­tant to fire and great for art. Lat­er, many more uses were found for sil­i­cone, but ini­tial­ly it was used in the cre­ation of sculp­tures.

Read also:

  • What to give on March 8: ideas for every taste and bud­get = “content_internal_link”>
  • Thank you, don’t: what not to give a girl on March 8

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